Monday, March 8, 2010

HOW TO ANSWER TO THE QUESTIONS OF IELTS SPEAKING TEST part -3

How should one answer the questions in the part 3 of the IELTS Speaking Module (also known as the two-way discussion)? Read this post to find out.

Two-Way Discussion (4-5 minutes)

*You will be asked questions within a specific topic area that is related to part 2. However, don't repeat what you have already mentioned in the individual long turn because although the topic is related to it, the questions will be different.

*In this part of the test, you will be asked to give your opinions, describe in detail, compare and contrast, discuss past situations and imagine possible future scenarios.

*Avoid impressing the examiner with big words that you may use incorrectly. Instead, use simple words to discuss complex ideas.

*Since opinion questions will be asked, so try to use a variety of phrases used in giving opinions to show your vocabulary range. There are many phrases you can use to give your opinions aside from 'I think'. Some examples of introductory opinion phrases are written below:
ex. In my opinion...
I believe...
If you ask me..
For me...
In my view…
As far as I'm concerned...

*As mentioned, Part 3 may include description questions. Hence, try to know at least the most commonly used adjectives and adverbs.

*Do not panic when you can't understand the question right away. Part 3 is really more difficult than parts 1 and 2. The examiner will want to see the 'ceiling' of your English ability that's why the questions are harder. Instead of getting nervous, try to use contex clues to guess the meaning of the question. Also, try to remember the previous question, it may somehow be related to the current one. If you really don't understand the question, you may ask the examiner to repeat it for you or rephrase it.

*You might be asked to describe past situations, so you have to make sure you're using the right past forms of verbs.

* Use words that show contrast and comparison.

*You might also be asked to imagine and describe possible future situations, so you need to know many ways of speaking about the future so as not to overdo the word 'will'. Some examples of such phrases are written below:
ex. It most probably will/won't...
Definitely, it's going to/not going to...
I hope that...
It might...
There's a reasonable chance that...
It's possible that...

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